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Biomedical Sciences
Dr. Richard Rawson
Senior Lecturer in Physiology

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Phone: 607 253 3748
E-mail: rer1@cornell.edu
Dr. Rawson is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Biomedical Sciences. He obtained his DVM from Kansas State University in 1978 and saw mixed animal practice until 1983. Dr. Rawson entered a PhD program in Veterinary Physiology at the University of Minnesota, graduating in 1987. His thesis research involved an investigation of the physiologic responses of newborn calves to the extreme cold that is commonly found at approximately 40 degrees latitude north around the globe.

Research Interests

While I maintain a longstanding interest in energy metabolism and responses of animals, particularly agriculturally important species, to the environment, my most recent efforts have focused on pedagogical questions and, in particular, simulation development. Currently, I am creating a computer-based simulation of fluid and electrolyte balance in dogs for use in the professional DVM curriculum. The model simulates the important facets of real cases, including display of routine laboratory data in "real time." Students can treat patients using standard approaches or experiment to see what works and what doesn't work. We expose model variables so that students can observe responses to their treatments in "real time" and draw conclusions for every "experiment" they run.

Select Publications

  1. Rawson, R. E., M. E. Dispensa, R. E. Goldstein, K. W. Nicholson, and N. K. Vidal. Development of a simulation for teaching fluid therapy. FASEB J. 22(1_MeetingAbstracts): 765, 2008.
  2. Entin, P. L., D. Robertshaw, and R. E. Rawson. Reduction of the PaCO2 set point during hyperthermic exercise in the sheep. Comp. Bioch. Physiol. 140(3): 309-316, 2005.
  3. Rawson, R. E., K. M. Quinlan, B. J. Cooper, C. Fewtrell, and J. R. Matlow. Writing-skills development in the health professions. Teach. Learn. Med. 17(3): 233-239, 2005.
  4. Brosh, A., Robertshaw, D., Aharoni, Y., Rawson, R. E., Gutman, M., Arieli, A., Shargal, E., and Choshniak, I. Estimation of energy expenditure in free-living adult and growing ruminants by heart rate measurement from cardiovascular system to whole animal. Souffrant, W. B. and Metges, C. C., eds. EAAP Publication No.109 Germany, Rostock-Warnemünde. pp. 473-476, 9-13-2003.
  5. Concannon, P. W., R. E. Rawson, and B. C. Tennant. Circannual patterns of oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient, and free thyroxine in photo-entrained male woodchucks. Am. J. Physiol. Submitted. 2003.
  6. Rawson, R. E. and K. M. Quinlan. Effectiveness of a computer-based approach to teaching acid-base physiology. Adv. Physiol. Educ. 26(2): 85-97, 2002.
  7. Rawson, R. E. Using technology to take a step back. J. Vet. Med. Educ. 29(1): 6-7, 2002.
  8. Concannon, P. W., V. D. Castracane, R. E. Rawson, and B. C. Tennant. Circannual changes in free thyroxine, prolactin, testes, and relative food intake in woodchucks, Marmota monax. Am. J. Physiol. 277(5 Pt 2): R1401-R1409, 1999.
  9. Entin, P. L. and R. E. Rawson. Arterial blood gas tensions during exercise in neonatal lambs. Respir. Physiol. 117(2-3): 161-169, 1999.
  10. Entin, P. L., D. Robertshaw, and R. E. Rawson. Effect of locomotor respiratory coupling on respiratory evaporative heat loss in the sheep. J. Appl. Physiol. 87(5): 1887-1893, 1999.
  11. Entin, P. L., D. Robertshaw, and R. E. Rawson. Thermal drive contributes to hyperventilation during exercise in sheep. J. Appl. Physiol. 85(1): 318-325, 1998.
  12. Krivitski, N. M., V. V. Kislukhin, A. Dobson, R. D. Gleed, R. E. Rawson, and D. Robertshaw. Volume of extravascular lung fluid determined by blood ultrasound velocity and electrical impedance dilution. ASAIO. J. 44(5): M535-M540, 1998.
  13. Rawson, R. E., P. W. Concannon, P. J. Roberts, and B. C. Tennant. Seasonal differences in resting oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient, and free thyroxine in woodchucks. Am. J. Physiol. 274(4 Pt 2): R963-R969, 1998.
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