Biological and Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program

 

 

Cornell Combined DVM/PhD Degree Program


Graduate Courses

Overview

Graduate level courses at Cornell are administered by the Graduate School. The graduate fields generally do not have specific course requirements. Instead, they defer to the student and to the student's Special Committee in selecting courses that are relevant to the individual's needs and interests. However, some graduate programs in the college do have course requirements. On recommendation of the student's Special Committee, and with the consent of the instructor, a student may register for any course offered by any department, school, or college in the University.

The suggested courses for students in the Combined DVM/PhD Degree Program combined degree program are listed below. These include courses in molecular and cellular biology. A course in Clinical Biostatistics (VTPMD 707) is also recommended as a good introduction to experimental design, data analysis, and interpretation.

Recommended Courses

The following courses are strongly recommended core courses.

  • Advanced Cell Biology (BIOMB 636): Spring. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOBM 330 or 333 or 331-332, and 432, or equivalents. Lec, T R 8:40-9:55. A. P. Bretscher and W. J. Brown. Aims to provide an integrated view of eukaryotic cell organization as elucidated using biochemical molecular, genetic, and cell biological approaches. Major topics include the cytoskeleton, membrane traffic, and cell polarity. Together with BIOBM 437, 632, and 639 this course provides broad coverage of the cell biology subject area.
  • The Nucleus (BIOMB 639): Spring. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BIOBM 330 or 333 or 331-332, or equivalent. Recommended: BIOGD 281. Lec, T R 10:10. J. T. Lis. Lectures on topics of eukaryotic genome organization, chromatin structure, regulation of gene expression, RNA processing, the structure and movement of chromosomes, and nuclear export and import. Covers the structure and function of the nucleus at the molecular and cell biological levels and, together with BIOBM 437, 632 and 636, provides broad coverage of the cell biology subject area.
  • Clinical Biostatistics (VTPMD 707): Spring. 2 credits. Minimum enrollment 2; maximum 15. Prerequisite: veterinary residents and graduate students. Letter grades only. Offered odd-numbered years. J. M. Scarlett, H. N. Erb and H. O. Mohammed. Explains the theory behind and interpretation of parametric and nonparametric statistical techniques commonly used in research/clinical medicine. Students analyze small data sets using a commercial statistical-software package.

Examples of other cross-disciplinary core courses for students to consider, depending on their area of research, include:

  • Biosynthesis of Macromolecules (BIOBM 633): Fall. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BIOBM 330 or 333 or 331-332. Recommended: BIOGD 281. Lec, T R 9:05. J. W. Roberts and D. B. Wilson. Synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins, and regulation of gene expression.
  • Protein Structure and Function (BIOMB 631): Fall. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOBM 330 or 333 or 331-332 and organic chemistry. Recommended: physical chemistry course. S-U grades optional. Lec, M W F 9:05. L. Nicholson. Presentations on the principles of protein structure and the nature of enzymatic catalysis. Specific topics include protein folding, stability, dynamics and evolution, folded conformations and structure prediction, ligand binding energetics, and the structural basis of catalysis.
  • Introduction to Epidemiology (VTPMD 664): Fall. 3 credits. Co-requisite: BTRY 601 (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences) or permission of instructor. S-U grades optional. H. N. Erb. Lectures and discussion deal with the fundamentals of epidemiology. Topics include outbreak investigation, causal association, data quality, the design and ethical constraints of clinical trials, and infectious-disease epidemiology.
  • Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology(VETMM 610): Fall. 2 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructors. S-U grades optional. Offered even-numbered years. C. M. S. Fewtrell and field of pharmacology faculty. Graduate-level course surveying the molecular and cellular aspects of receptor mechanisms, signaling pathways, and effector systems. Topics include drug-receptor interactions; ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels; G protein pathways; growth factor signaling; calcium; nutrient and nitric oxide signaling; mechanisms of receptor-mediated effects on neural excitability, electrical pacemakers, muscle contraction, gene expression; and chemotherapy, including antimicrobial agents and cancer chemotherapy.
  • Systems Pharmacology (VETMM 611): Spring. 2 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructors. S-U grades optional. Offered even-numbered years. C. M. S. Fewtrell and field of pharmacology faculty. Graduate-level course surveying system- and organ-related aspects of pharmacology. Topics include drug disposition; pharmacokinetics; autonomic pharmacology; central nervous system pharmacology; pharmacology of inflammation, allergy, and platelet function; and cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and endocrine pharmacology.